Volume 3, Issue 2, June 2018, Page: 31-35
Screening for Plasmid-Mediated Multidrug Resistant Bacteria in Ikpoba River Water Samples
Akpe Azuka Romanus, Department of Microbiology, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Nigeria
Okwu Grace Ifeoma, Department of Microbiology, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Nigeria
Esumeh Frederick Ikechukwu, Department of Microbiology, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Nigeria
Femi, Department of Microbiology, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Nigeria
Imah Justus, Department of Microbiology, Ambrose Alli University, Ekpoma, Nigeria
Received: Mar. 30, 2018;       Accepted: Apr. 16, 2018;       Published: May 7, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.ijmb.20180302.11      View  822      Downloads  60
Abstract
The abuse and extensive use of antimicrobial agents by humans may increase resistant bacteria populations in the aquatic environment. The discharge of untreated wastewater into rivers and other non-point sources of pollution have led to the antibiotic resistant bacteria in the environment, particularly in surface waters. Studies on river water pollution and their implication to public health has been ongoing. Screening for multi-drug resistant bacterial status of Ikpoba River in Benin City, Nigeria was carried out using standard microbiological and physicochemical procedures. The bacteria isolated from the river water samples were E. coli, Salmonella sp, Vibrio sp, Staphylococcus aureus, and Streptococcus faecalis. The antibiotics susceptibility testing of the isolates revealed a multi-drug resistant status for Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus faecalis. The plasmid profile of these multi-drug resistant isolates was determined and results revealed that both isolates harboured plasmid of size 4.5kb. Antibiotic susceptibility of the isolates when cured of plasmid revealed loss of resistance to over 75% of the antibiotics they were originally resistant to. The microbial and physicochemical properties of the river showed that it is unfit for human consumption. The Plasmid mediated multidrug resistant status of some of the isolates is a threat to chemotherapy and is a cause for public health concern.
Keywords
River Water, Antibiotics, Pollution, Multi-drug Resistance, Plasmid
To cite this article
Akpe Azuka Romanus, Okwu Grace Ifeoma, Esumeh Frederick Ikechukwu, Femi, Imah Justus, Screening for Plasmid-Mediated Multidrug Resistant Bacteria in Ikpoba River Water Samples, International Journal of Microbiology and Biotechnology. Vol. 3, No. 2, 2018, pp. 31-35. doi: 10.11648/j.ijmb.20180302.11
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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